Maryland Women Sweep Indiana 83-72, Finish Unbeaten at Home

The Maryland Lady Terrapins didn’t have a lot to play for on Senior Night. The fifth-ranked Terps had already wrapped up the Big Ten regular season championship, coming through on the preseason picks by the media and the league’s coaches. They had already beaten the Indiana Lady Hoosiers in their first meeting this season, 84-74 at Assembly Hall in Bloomington on Jan. 25, and came into the rematch on Feb. 26 on a 19-game winning streak.

Before the game, Maryland took the time to honor both Andrea Mize and Laurin Mincy, the graduating seniors from each team. Maryland head coach Brenda Frese presented flowers to Mize, and then a tribute video was played on the scoreboard, honoring the career of Mincy, a redshirt senior from Newark, New Jersey. Mincy came into the game among the program’s all-time leaders in points (1,238), three-pointers made (120) and free-throw percentage (86.4). She was joined at center court by her family, and was presented with a framed black jersey. She then proceeded to give the home fans at Xfinity Center a lot to cheer about.

Mincy scored a career-high 28 points to lead four players in double-figures as Maryland (26-2, 17-0 Big Ten) pulled away for an 83-72 win to complete the season sweep of Indiana (14-14, 4-13 Big Ten) in front of a crowd of 5,601. The game itself got off to a slow start. Both team went scoreless for the first 2:16, until Malina Howard knocked down a jump shot for Maryland. That was the first of four straight field goals by the Terrapins. However, despite poor shooting, Indiana kept hanging around, until Howard went on a one-woman run. She made two short jumpers, got fouled on a layup and made the free throw to complete a three-point play for seven straight points to give Maryland a 36-25 lead with just under five minutes left in the first half.

Maryland redshirt senior Laurin Mincy (seventh from left, holding picture frame) is joined by her family and head coach Brenda Frese during an on-court ceremony prior to Maryland's final home game of the season against Indiana. Photo courtesy Maryland Athletics.
Maryland redshirt senior Laurin Mincy (seventh from left, holding picture frame) is joined by her family and head coach Brenda Frese during an on-court ceremony prior to Maryland’s final home game of the season against Indiana. Photo courtesy Maryland Athletics.

 

The Hoosiers responded with a 6-2 run to pull with seven at the media timeout with 3:06 left in the half. Maryland re-established some breathing room by making their last three shots to close the first half with a 9-4 run, capped by a Mincy three-pointer from in front of the Indiana bench, for a 47-35 halftime lead. Mincy finished the first half with 15 points to lead all scorers. The first half proved to be very physical, with several Maryland players coming up limping after hard collisions, some of which weren’t whistled for fouls. Frese said she was disappointed with how the officials handled those collisions.

“Maybe I need to go back and read the rule book and go back to see what constitutes a foul,” Frese said, adding that the amount of physicality that the officials allowed by both teams during the game was indicative of what Maryland can expect during postseason play.

In the second half, Maryland missed its first five shots before Lexie Brown took the ball to the basket for a layup, got fouled and completed the three-point play. She followed that up with another layup the next trip down the floor to give Maryland a 52-39 lead just over three minutes into the half. Mincy added a jumper and a three to give the Terps a 60-44 lead with 13:41 left, but Karlee McBride and Jess Walter combined to hit four straight threes to bring Indiana back within four, 62-58, with just under nine minutes left. Maryland finally seized control after the final media timeout. After Larryn Brooks made a free throw to make it 71-62 with 3:59 left, the Terps went on an 8-2 run over the next 1:40 to take a 79-64 lead, and wouldn’t look back from there. Maryland finishes the season undefeated at home, and will attempt to go undefeated in the Big Ten on Sunday for Senior Day at Northwestern.

Mincy says she’ll miss her teammates and the Maryland fans the most, and she wanted to play competitively in her final regular season college home game.

“I didn’t have a Senior Night in high school, so obviously I wanted to come out here and play hard. I had a lot of family and friends and fans here, so I wanted to go out with a bang.” She says it hasn’t really sunk in for her yet that she’ll be moving on after graduating in May. Frese praised Mincy for being willing to battle through injury during her five years with the team.

“You talk about five years, three surgeries, the adversity she had to face, and that she battled. Often times, young people anymore don’t want to fight through tough times. They don’t want to go through it; they don’t want to feel uncomfortable,” Frese said. “She’s a living example and why she has the utmost respect of her staff and her teammates, because that’s what she did. She put her head down, she went to work, and she battled, and will always have a special place in my heart because of that.” Howard said the team wanted to reward Mincy for all the effort she’s put into the program.

“Having a senior like Laurin, it’s just really special to send her out that way. She’s put so much into the program. She means a lot to all of us. We all love and care about her, and so just to have a teammate that you care that much about, you just want to send them out on the right note,” said Howard, who finished with a season-high 16 points, along with six rebounds.

During halftime, the Terps honored their three graduating student managers. During the first media timeout in the second half, the graduating seniors from the pep band were also recognized on the video board.

Read-through of “Topdog/Underdog” complex, compelling

This past week, a crowd gathered in the Wright theatre to watch a dynamic reading of Suzan-Lori Parks’ Pulitzer Prize winning “Topdog/Underdog”. The read-through was one of three theatre performances at the 7th annual African American Arts Festival, co-sponsered by Spotlight UB and the Diversity and Culture office. Kimberly Lynne, who is teaching Playwriting at UB for the first time this semester, put together the reading.

Topdog/Underdog follows two African American brothers, played by J Hargrove and Brandan Tate, through a few pivotal weeks of their lives. Through their conversations about the past and present, the play explores the unique and perhaps insurmountable obstacles that they face as black men with troubled pasts.

As Topdog/Underdog was a read through, the production was minimal, bringing in only the most essential elements. The two actors spent much of their time sitting on stools and working with invisible props and modest costumes. Kerrin Smith, a current MFA student, read the stage directions so that the audience could follow the narrative.

Despite the simplicity of the read-through, the gravity of the original work was still present. Building on the undeniable quality of the script, Hargrove and Tate brought the play to life. From their very first interaction, the chemistry between the two was raw and believable. Their brother’s relationship, in all its fierce loyalty and competition, had humor and tragedy that easily captured my attention.

It was this complexity, found in the characters, plot and themes of the play, which led Lynne to set up the reading in the first place. The Playwriting course relies on reading plays and using them as examples.

“I’m not happy with current playwriting textbooks,” Lynne explained. “So I use good script examples to discuss all the various elements of the play. “Topdog” is a great example of perfect protagonist/antagonist orchestration, natural dialogue, plot structure and character arc matching plot arc, and pacing.”

By the end of the reading of the play, hearing it read by such talented actors greatly deepened my experience of Parks’ work. I have little doubt that the Playwriting class, and those students or community members who also attended, felt the same.

Spotlight’s next production is “Purgatory”, a short and terrifying play by William Butler Yeats on Thursday, March 26 at 12:30 and 5:30 for Lynne’s Irish Culture and Steve Matanle’s Irish Literature courses.

Spotlight UB presents a performance by Aspen String Trio

Shall We Dance?

You do not want to miss a wonderful event happening this March! The Spotlight UB will be bringing the Aspen String Trio to the University of Baltimore. See the flyer for more details.

When: Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Where:  21 W. Mt. Royal Avenue

Wright Theater | Univerisity of Baltimore Student Center

When: 7:00 p.m.

Tickets: $15/ general admission

$10/seniors/UB faculty and staff

$5/students and alumni

Purchase tickets: www.etix.com (search for “UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE”)

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March 2015 Issue

We have another great issue for you all. In this issue features two photo essays, more box subscriptions, delicious recipes, news about what’s going on around campus and a special column from UB’s own DDG.

Check out our February 2015 issue below. This is issue is on stands now. Pick up your copy!

UBPost March 2015

Unavoidable chaos, unlimited beauty

By Nicole Hovermale

I have always been fascinated with India and the thought of hippie- era travelers wandering endlessly through this enchanting land. What would it be like to travel through the center of spiritualism, through a land that has held tight to its traditions instead of trying to emulate the West, and in a place known to spark inner awakenings in people?

In India, just a walk down the street is no simple feat as the senses are bombarded with every step. An explosion of colors—brightly dyed textiles hanging in shops, orange marigolds once hung from doors trampled into the asphalt, rainbows of fresh vegetables and ground spices, and beautifully decorated temples—infiltrates the eyes. The sweet aroma of fried jalebi and spiced masala tea mingles in the air with the smell of livestock and burning trash. The constant blare of car horns overpowers the ears, but has no luck drowning out the sharp ring of the temple’s cleansing bell or the sounds of musical chanting. An array of spices that electrify the taste buds with every bite are cooked into all kinds of culinary delights that can be tasted on every street corner. India isn’t a place to visit; it’s a place to experience.

Chaos is unavoidable in the overcrowded and often dirty streets of both large cities and small towns. Camel and horse- drawn carts plod along while the cars, trucks, and tuktuks zoom by bicycles, cows, and pedestrians, who often have no other choice than to walk in the road.
Chaos is unavoidable in the overcrowded and often dirty streets of both large cities and small towns. Camel and horse- drawn carts plod along while the cars, trucks, and tuktuks zoom by bicycles, cows, and pedestrians, who often have no other choice than to walk in the road.

 

Vendors sell their wares along a street in Old Delhi. The tangle of wires above them are not defunct; electricians in Delhi know perfectly well where each one leads.
Vendors sell their wares along a street in Old Delhi. The tangle of wires above them are not defunct; electricians in Delhi know perfectly well where each one leads.

 

A man gets his mustache trimmed at one of the makeshift barbershops set up on the sidewalk, which are commonplace in Indian streets.
A man gets his mustache trimmed at one of the makeshift barbershops set up on the sidewalk, which are commonplace in Indian streets.

 

Small shrines, sometimes built into walls in public places, are common throughout India. Ganesh, one of the most widely worshiped of the millions of Hindu gods, is also commonly found in household shrines. This elephant-headed god is said to bring good luck to his devotees.
Small shrines, sometimes built into walls in public places, are common throughout India. Ganesh, one of the most widely worshiped of the millions of Hindu gods, is also commonly found in household shrines. This elephant-headed god is said to bring good luck to his devotees.

 

Varanasi, considered the spiritual capital of India, is situated directly on the banks of the holy Ganga River. The old part of the city is a winding labyrinth of enclosed streets that lead out to the ghats, a series of steps that run along the riverbank. This particular street, lined with wood for the cremations, leads to one of the smaller burning ghats, were Hindu believers bring their deceased loved ones to be cleansed one last time in the river’s holy water and cremated in open air fires along the banks of the Ganga.
Varanasi, considered the spiritual capital of India, is situated directly on the banks of the holy Ganga River. The old part of the city is a winding labyrinth of enclosed streets that lead out to the ghats, a series of steps that run along the riverbank. This particular street, lined with wood for the cremations, leads to one of the smaller burning ghats, were Hindu believers bring their deceased loved ones to be cleansed one last time in the river’s holy water and cremated in open air fires along the banks of the Ganga.

 

Flowers are used all over India for both decoration and worship. Mari- golds are popular because of their rich orange hue, given the saffron color is sacred in Hinduism. These flowers were left at the base of a tree outside a Hindu temple.
Flowers are used all over India for both decoration and worship. Mari- golds are popular because of their rich orange hue, given the saffron color is sacred in Hinduism. These flowers were left at the base of a tree outside a Hindu temple.

 

Regarded as holy creatures, cows wander the streets freely and seem to fit right into the bustle of daily life. In some towns, shop owners feed the cows sugary sweets: other times cows can be seen feasting on trash. This particular cow seems to be looking for a healthy snack, but if it tries to eat off the vegetable stands it will quickly be shooed away, so it better stick to the discarded morsels on the ground.
Indian weddings are large gatherings, celebrated by many extended family members and friends, and tradition- ally can last up to eight days. This wedding was condensed into a couple days, with the American bride arriv- ing just days before the ceremony to shop for her wedding lehenga and sari. The lehenga is traditionally red, a color said to bring good luck, and is embellished with rhinestones, making this dress weigh almost 20 pounds. The main ceremony involved rituals, offerings to the Hindu gods, and an exchange of wedding vows in front of friends and family.

 

Regarded as holy creatures, cows wander the streets freely and seem to fit right into the bustle of daily life. In some towns, shop owners feed the cows sugary sweets: other times cows can be seen feasting on trash. This particular cow seems to be looking for a healthy snack, but if it tries to eat off the vegetable stands it will quickly be shooed away, so it better stick to the discarded morsels on the ground..
Regarded as holy creatures, cows wander the streets freely and seem to fit right into the bustle of daily life. In some towns, shop owners feed the cows sugary sweets: other times cows can be seen feasting on trash. This particular cow seems to be looking for a healthy snack, but if it tries to eat off the vegetable stands it will quickly be shooed away, so it better stick to the discarded morsels on the ground..

 

Rajasthan, also known as the Land of Kings, is home to the Thar Desert. Trekking out into the barren desert with camels, I was lucky to spend a night sleeping under the stars, eating around the campfire, and living life—if only for a moment—as a nomad.
Rajasthan, also known as the Land of Kings, is home to the Thar Desert. Trekking out into the barren desert with camels, I was lucky to spend a night sleeping under the stars, eating around the campfire, and living life—if only for a moment—as a nomad.

Cruisin’ the Seven Seas

This winter break, I departed on trip that is all too familiar, but nonetheless a favorite of mine—a Caribbean cruise. We booked a cruise aboard the Carnival Pride to the Western Caribbean debarking from Tampa, Florida, for seven nights. One of the biggest attractions to cruising is the all-inclusive food factor. With the exception of soft drinks and alcohol, everything is included in your cruising experience. Of course, you have to pay for extras like excursions and trips to the spa as well, but cruising is still a great value for your dollar. We visited Costa Maya, Mexico; Belize; Mahogany Bay, Isla Roatan, Honduras; and Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands.

The Carnival Experience 

The food selections on cruises are endless and I’ve never had an item off their menu that I didn’t like. Really like lobster? Feel free to order two of them on surf and turf night. It’s all included.

The menu changes daily in the main dining room so if there are two or three appetizers that look good, order them all because they won’t be there tomorrow. Menu choices include a variety of hot and cold soups (Spiced Pumpkin (pictured), Bing Cherry (pictured), Cucumber (pictured), and Mango are just a few varieties), sushi, prosciutto and melon (pictured), escargot (pictured), shrimp and grits, bacon macaroni and cheese (pictured), salads, prime rib, steak, lobster, and a myriad of desserts, including crème brûlée, cheesecake, chocolate lava cake, tiramisu, and orange cake (pictured), and so much more.

Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands 

From the ship, the island is five miles away by tender and takes roughly 10 minutes to get there. Known for its crystal clear waters, this year-round paradise is home away from home for many of the world’s one percenters.
From the ship, the island is five miles away by tender and takes roughly 10 minutes to get there. Known for its crystal clear waters, this year-round paradise is home away from home for many of the world’s one percenters.

Local Caymanians are some of the most wonderful and genuine people I’ve ever met; however, they are few and far between. In a coun- try that’s famous for its lax banking regulations and privacy, expats flock to this island in droves. Its beautiful crystal blue waters and white sand beaches are some of the reasons that tourists visit. While the conversion rate is only $0.80 on the $1.00 US, most tourists that escape to the Caymans are looking for fun in the sun, fresh local seafood, snorkeling along the Barrier Reef, or playing with sea turtles and stingrays. Cay- manite, a neutral-colored stone found only in the Caymans, is made into jewelry, making jewelry shopping a favored pastime as well. Because of the Barrier Reef and shallow water surrounding the island, cruise ships must drop anchor approximately five miles off shore and passengers must use tenders (smaller transport boats that hold between 150-300 people) to get ashore.

Coming back to your stateroom to a folded towel critter (pictured) is a highlight of cruising with Carnival. Carnival even sells a book so that you can fold towels on your own at home.

Along with the towel animals, you’ll find mints on your pillows and Fun Times, Carnival’s daily newsletter complete with calendar of events and sales for the day in their duty free shopping area.

Costa Maya, Mexico 

Taking in the view from one of the island’s many waterfront seafood restaurants while indulging in fresh conch fritters on Grand Cayman.

Costa Maya, Mexico is a port that is strictly for cruise ships. There is plenty of local shopping, a few restaurants with authentic Mexican cuisine, a lazy river area, and a small beach area. For those looking for adventure, a short drive with a Carnival sponsored excursion can offer dune buggy adventures, scuba diving, or a tour in glass bottom boat, just to name a few. For those who are willing to travel a little further, an hour and a half will allow you to tour some of the Mayan Ruins.

Lover’s Wall is a rock wall along- side Heritage Beach. Photo courtesy of Cayman Tourism
Lover’s Wall is a rock wall along- side Heritage Beach.
Photo courtesy of Cayman Tourism

Belize 

Lush local plants grow throughout the country. Like everything at the Belize Zoo, these two varieties were found growing in their natural environment.
Lush local plants grow throughout the country. Like everything at the Belize Zoo, these two varieties were found growing in their natural environment.

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In Belize, the shopping potential is endless. Whether you are looking for duty-free liquor, handmade jewelry made of wood or bone, or knockoff designer handbags and Beats headphones, this is the spot for you. Just to start, Belize offers horseback riding safaris, cave tubing, snorkeling, and tours of the city or zoo.

The zoo is found in a remote area of the Belize. Completely natural, visitors can get up close and personal with local wildlife. Unlike the zoos in the United States, only basic cages separate you and the animals, allowing for better photo opportunities as well as a chance to take your life in your hands when it comes to the big cats. Over 320 varieties of birds are found in Belize. Popular birds include the Keel Billed Toucan, Brown Pelican, and a variety of parrots and parakeets. Five native big cats call Belize home.

They include the Jaguar, Jaguarundi, Margay, Mountain Lion (pictured), and Ocelot (pictured). Other native wildlife includes Collared Peccary, Crocodile (pictured), Coyote, Gray Fox, Spotted Skunk, Spider Monkey, and White-tailed Deer, just like the ones found in Maryland.

Mahogany Bay, Isla Roatan, Honduras 

Lush landscape of Roatan.
Lush landscape of Roatan.

Roatan is one of the outlying islands of Honduras. Its beautiful and lush landscape includes rainforests, the beach, and winding mountains. Perfect for ziplining, Catamaran sailing, swimming with dolphins, touring the countryside this country is a photographer’s dream. Rich in culture, the Best of Roatan tour offered a perspective of the island that most tourists don’t have an opportunity to see. Traveling away from the beach, participants visit Rusty Fish, where they repurpose local metal scrap into inspirational artwork, followed by Roatan Chocolate Factory where the island makes chocolate without any dairy.

At the Rusty Fish, artists recycle and repurpose scrap metal into unique artwork.
At the Rusty Fish, artists recycle and repurpose scrap metal into unique artwork.
embers of the Garifuna, a local tribe, sing and dance to one of their tribe’s songs Song of the Sun. 
embers of the Garifuna, a local tribe, sing and dance to one of their tribe’s songs Song of the Sun.

Forget your chocolate bar in the hot Honduran sun? No worries, it doesn’t melt! Next on the tour is the Roatan Rum Company where you can buy rum cake in five different flavors (coconut, banana, 151 proof, tropical spice, and original) and Rum in four varieties (coconut, mango, 151 proof, and original). The last stop is to visit the secretive Garifuna tribe where spectators take in a native song and dance and try Cassava bread, a traditional dish of the tribe. Other local delicacies include iguana and blue crabs. Unlike Maryland Blue crabs, these land crabs are actually brown and burrow in the ground.

Clay oven used to cook Cassava bread
Clay oven used to cook Cassava bread

 

All photos courtesy of Jessica Greenstein unless otherwise credited