Color Theory

The Color Theory: Denim is Not Going Anywhere

Photo: Jeff Dominguez – The Sting

For some, a change in season can possibly mean a change in your wardrobe. Coming into this newly fresh fall season, you might switch up your style and experiment with different combinations – maybe wearing more baggy clothings, rather than ones that feel tight around your jungulars. Or just tweaking it up a little bit that best fits your aesthetic – maybe wearing more colorful shirts, rather than wearing all black everything (I promise you, I am not judging!).

But the one thing that never goes out of style, no matter what day of the year it is: Denim.

We all have it, whether it be your favorite jeans or that one timeless jean jacket that came from the 90s. Denim has always been the frontier of the fashion industry, according to fashion historian Emma McClendon.

Photo: Jeff Dominguez – The Sting

Over the years, denim has transcended the fashion industry. In her book, Denim: Fashion’s Frontier, McClendon explains that denim has transformed from a “working class fabric” to everyday dress and high fashion since it’s creation by Levi’s in 1873.  Its image has shifted throughout history as a symbol of the American workforce, youth, rebellion, sexuality, social-political movements, and the ephemeral quality of dressing “cool and edgy.”

Notably, denim is currently the world’s leading fabric, and has been for the better part of the last century. For most people, denim clothes (whether it be jeans, jackets, or shirts) is always a great choice for any wardrobe.

According to Statista, the global market for denim accounted for almost $90 billion US dollars in 2019 alone. This year, the current jean value is up to over $110 billion US dollars so far; and it is projected to increase to $127 billion by 2023. To say the least, denim is not going anywhere anytime soon.

You can look at other statistics of the denim industry here.

Photo: Jeff Dominguez – The Sting

So you are probably wondering, “Ok Jeff, I get it. Denim is in style. But how can I incorporate it into my outfits?” Well, you basically have two options: wear something that complements your denim or wear double denim.

Lets say your favorite jean jacket is the piece that you want to stand out. Take a look at its color/shade – hence the name of this column, The Color Theory. Lighter shades of the denim blue complement lighter colors, such as white, yellow, and rose/pink. Similarly, darker shades complement dark shades of the color spectrum, such as black, grey, and red.

What about wearing double denim?

That is totally fine, but be cautious. Wearing denim on denim can make it look like you are wearing a uniform, or maybe a jumpsuit (unless that is your approach, that is fine too!). Double denim isn’t really all that bad though, just keep in mind you can still look good as long as the two pieces of denim are matching shades.

Photo: Jeff Dominguez – The Sting

Since fall is here, traditionally some people start to look for outfits for the colder weather. It seems like almost every year, we buy a new pair of jeans because naturally our bodies change over a period of time. Plus, having those same jeans lose its color and size from washing it over time is also a huge factor. But I would say though, probably the hardest part about finding the perfect jeans is having your ass fit in them – and for the guys like myself, having your jungulars breathe too (those damn, skinny jeans!).

Jeff Dominguez is the Communications Director for The Sting and writes The Color Theory, a bi-weekly fashion column.

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