Baltimore

Covid-19 has detrimental impact on college students with children

There’s no doubt that Covid-19 has impacted our lives in one way or another, but how has it impacted college students? How it has impacted parents that are also college students? 

According to Dr. Aleksander Aristovnik, during the lockdown students primarily raised concerns about their future career and study issues among other anxieties and frustrations.

One University of Baltimore student, who preferred to go by M.Martinez, said she finds herself having less motivation in a virtual environment. “It’s just not what I’m used to, and I noticed that last spring, also, I was not as focused, I was not as interested in the material, I wasn’t learning it as easily.” 

A’Ja Ross, a college student at Prince George’s Community College, said that the demands of remote learning and the lingering threat of Covid-19 have placed tremendous stress on college students across the country. 

But for those who are juggling their studies in addition to helping their school-aged children navigate virtual classes, this semester can be overwhelming. 

Another student at UB,  who preferred to go by M. Delgado, felt the same way. Delgado has two elementary school-aged children who are currently studying virtually as well, and she has a full-time job.

Delgado has to stay close to her children during the daytime, just in case they need any help with the assignments or they don’t understand something. After helping them, she rushes to go to work. 

The only time she has to focus on her studies is late at night and on Sundays. To add fuel to the fire, Delgado says that Covid has made it difficult to afford most of her expenses such as tuition, rent, internet, etc. “From March until May 2020 they closed down my job due to Covid-19. I have never been more scared in my life than at that moment. I thought about all the responsibilities I had.” 

That period was financially challenging for Delgado and it affected her studies as well. Not having a stable internet connection, she had to drop some of her classes. “I was supposed to graduate earlier but I didn’t want to fail any of my classes due to poor internet connection, so I lowered the risk by dropping two of my classes.” 

However, now Delgado’s job is opened back up and she is determined to graduate despite all the obstacles she has to face every day.

Artjona Lireza is a staff writer for The Sting.

Categories: Baltimore, Campus

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