MICA Mondays: Paulette

MICA Mondays is a project of the UB Post (University of Baltimore) showcasing the talent and work of students and alumni of the nearby Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) released every Monday during the fall and spring semesters.

Artist Details: Paulette – MICA 2020

http://www.instagram.com/monstertruckfairy/

http://www.pallasinspace.tumblr.com

http://www.pauletteandherhart.wixsite.com


Produced By: Nathaly Rivera

Edited by: Nathaly Rivera


MICA Mondays: Eric Simelton

Eric Simelton is a senior at MICA studying animation. His art, inspired by his love for anime (such as shows like Dragon Ball Z), draws on his passion for high octane fights and motion graphics. Simelton is currently working on his portfolio for graduation, and is looking to work in the animation industry.

MICA Mondays is a project of the UB Post (University of Baltimore) showcasing the talent and work of students and alumni of the nearby Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) released every Monday during the fall and spring semesters.

Artist Details: Eric Simelton – MICA 2020

http://www.instagram.com/ericddarius/

http://www.vimeo.com/ericsimelton


Produced by: Benjamin Kahn and Jeff Dominguez

Host: Benjamin Kahn

Edited by: Jeff Dominguez

MICA Mondays: RJ Sterling

RJ Sterling is a graduate student at MICA studying comic book artistry. His art, inspired by his love for storytelling, draws on experiences from himself and social conflicts within minority groups. Sterling currently teaches aspiring comic artists and has his own LLC, Hilarious Comics.

MICA Mondays is a project of the UB Post (University of Baltimore) showcasing the talent and work of students and alumni of the nearby Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) released every Monday during the fall and spring semesters.


Produced by: Benjamin Kahn and Jeff Dominguez

Host: Benjamin Kahn

Edited by: Jeff Dominguez

MICA Mondays: Dylan Jones

Dylan Jones is a senior at MICA studying painting. His art, inspired by his love for sports, draws on experiences from himself and other athletes to include perseverance, injury, defeat, and triumph.

MICA Mondays is a project of the UB Post (University of Baltimore) showcasing the talent and work of students and alumni of the nearby Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) released every Monday during the fall and spring semesters.


Produced by: Benjamin Kahn and Jeff Dominguez

Host: Benjamin Kahn

Edited by: Jeff Dominguez

Why the Grammys Are Completely Irrelevant

Billy Eilish (left) and Finneas O’Connell at The Grammys press room on Sunday, January 26th 2020. Photo Credit: Chris Pizzello, AP Photo

The Grammys are irrelevant. 

They tell people what they should listen to, all the while most of the music they celebrate has a basic beat with recycled melodies and lyrics. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed some Grammy winning albums, including 2019’s This Land by Gary Clark Jr, which won best contemporary blues album at this year’s awards, but for the most part, the awards are given to artists who simply didn’t deserve them.

Now you might be thinking I just hate modern music. You might be thinking I’m a snob who doesn’t appreciate quips from Billie Eilish about her Invisalign (which was literally the entire first track on her freshman effort), but to me this isn’t a modern issue. The Grammys have always lacked integrity. They do not recognize enough musical and songwriting talent. They recognize the airplay that puts songs at the top of the charts and sell out to the masses who are resistant to music that doesn’t follow a certain guideline as to what constitutes a single or a hit song.

For reference, The Beatles only won four Grammy awards while the group was together. Yes, you read that right. The infamous songwriting team of Lennon/McCartney coupled with the talent of George Harrison and Ringo Starr won less than five awards while playing music together. Their music is widely considered to be some of the best Pop/Rock music ever written. The Beatles are perhaps the benchmark that any concurrent artists measure their success upon and they won fewer Grammy awards than the Dixie Chicks

The Beatles aren’t alone in a lack of awards for such talented musicians. Led Zeppelin only ever won one award, and that was only for the live album Celebration Day in 2014, which many Zeppelin fans consider to be a subpar performance. Otis Redding, the father of R&B, won two. Nas, Queen and The Who are among those artists who have never won a Grammy.

This isn’t to say you can’t enjoy the music of Lil Nas X, Billie Eilish or Lizzo. After all, tastes in music are purely subjective. However, listeners look beyond tracks that win the awards or top the charts and focus on songs that contain substance and are profound works of art. Notice the similarities in labels and producers among albums and songs you listen to and you might be surprised. You might even find the best band you’ve never heard in your life.

And maybe go throw on a copy of Let It Be, which unbelievably never won a Grammy.

Tony Sheaffer is a senior writer for the UB Post. He writes a weekly music column, Friday Groove.

Call to Action

How Art and Guns Coincide

Over the course of the year, the nation has seen a fair share of tragedies from police brutality to domestic terrorism and mass shootings. Mass shootings have become some sort of phenomena plaguing American culture since 1966. Nearly a third of the world’s mass shootings took place in the United States of America; in other words the U.S holds 5% of the world’s population yet it has had 31% of mass shootings. The definition of the mass shooting varies, however the Gun Violence Archive describes mass shooting as any incident occurring where four or more people are wounded or killed. This year, the nation experienced one of the deadliest shootings in history, the Orlando night club shooting. Four years ago, the Sandy Hook shooting happened, during which 27 were killed. Five years before the Virginia Tech Massacre killed 32 people.

The issue become increasingly prevalent as of late, not stopping at mass shootings but extending to violence that occurs within the side streets of Baltimore City neighborhoods. Gun Violence and mass shootings even lead to the loss of young children’s lives. In 2014, three-year-old McKenzie Elliot was shot in a drive by shooting on her porch. Although, it may seem like a constant tug of war, a Baltimore artist has seen enough and expresses her stance on gun violence via oil paints.

Kimberly Sheridan, a widow of a veteran is artist to use their medium to take a stance and send a message. Sheridan is a self-taught who began painting at age 30. On April 14, 2013, she began painting victims of gun violence. Sheridan says, “That is when Congress just wouldn’t even bother to bring back background checks to committee. They didn’t even bring it to the table. It wasn’t important. But 90% of Americans wanted it… after Sandy Hook.” Sheridan does not receive anything for these but has a particular mission in mind.

Her mission is to paint the one million victims of gun violence. Her work has been displayed in Liam Flynn’s ale house with the exhibit, “Million Gun Victims March.” Sheridan says she, “becomes someone else. I forget myself, it’s not about me. As each subject arrives on canvas, [I] kind of shut down certain parts of the mind and try to imagine as close as I can what this person was really like, what this person really wanted to do when they were still alive.” Sheridan describes herself as being exasperated at seeing victims of violence. The only option was for her to paint.

I see if these pictures can act as a bridge over an emotional gap that all their deaths leave behind. The gap is still there, but at least you can be a different space, cross over to a different side but the gap will always be there but you’re not trapped by it. That’s what I’m trying to do. The families that she can are contacted and later given the canvas after display. Her work includes victims ranging from old to young and somewhat familiar faces. Sheridan painted Freddie Gray’s older brother.

Sheridan also paints “suicide row”– photos to the misunderstood victims of suicide. Her message is simple– oil paintings commemorating the tragedies of victims’ while raising questions hen and how many more? When will this be seen as an issue that needs to be resolved?  Whether the mission is a call to action for gun violence or a statement about brutalities plaguing society, art has a voice and a mission.