SGA Makes A Last Ditch Effort to Bring Pass/Fail Option

University of Baltimore’s Student Government Association has made a last ditch effort to reverse the university back to an alternative grading model. 

Although administration, faculty, and students have deliberated on the issue since earlier this year, little progress has been made as the university has gone without the option since the summer semester.

In early November, the Student Government Association unanimously passed a resolution titled “Resolution 11, Resolution Providing Students with Academic Relief” asking for an extension of the option. At the November 25 SGA meeting, Treasurer Camilla Canner said, “The idea was that during this COVID-19 pandemic, there are a lot of extenuating circumstances that would perhaps make it difficult for a student to finish a class with a grade that would allow them to pass. The Pass/Fail grade gives an option to continue working on their degree.” This was a sentiment shared by all of the SGA, as they felt this was the best way to advocate for students.

Nevertheless, this resolution seems to have fallen on deaf ears. Many faculty members believe that this option not only hampers the ability to track student progress and accurately report information for financial aid requirements but is a blow to the reputation of the institution. 

“Data shows that a pass/fail option is unnecessary,” says interim provost Catherine Anderson. An internal report from the registrar shows similar distributions between spring 2019 and spring 2020 grades with the latter actually being higher and showing fewer withdrawals from courses. 

“Only 5 percent of undergraduate and graduate students used the no credit/credit option and distribution shows that most of those grades were Cs and Ds,” said Anderson. “About the same percent of grades were Fs in the no credit column. In other words, the alternative grading did not greatly boost academic performance.”

She adds, “Ultimately, doing what faculty felt was in the best interests of students, we did not support a Pass/Fail option for students this semester nor did any other USM schools for this fall.” 

Students like senior Zachary Romer believe that a pass/fail option is essential to his ability to graduate without having to incur the cost of a three credit semester in the spring.  To assuage his worst fears, he took 18 credits but did not anticipate the myriad of pandemic-related consequences for this decision.

“When [professors] are not giving full attention to students or even making an effort to try to help students meet their learning objectives,” said Romer. “Ultimately, there is a disengagement from students because they see the disengagement from their professors.” 

“Professors,” he says, “have not abided by their office hours,” citing personal challenges without extending the same leniency to students while also occasionally dropping “ridiculous” grading curves to push them through. 

For the past few months, SGA members have been in negotiations with members of the Faculty Senate and administration in hopes of garnering support for the legislation. Beginning in the summer, attempts to pressure the Faculty Senate to make a recommendation fell flat. Michael Kiel, Faculty Senate president, explained that the Board of Regents’ report addressing UB’s finances released earlier this year has occupied the minds of faculty members.

“I could have probably brought it up sooner and maybe I should have,” said Kiel. “Not a single faculty senator was in favor of discussing it. It gave even more reason to avoid it among other more dominating topics.” 

On December 3rd, SGA president Daniel Khoshkepazi and SGA vice president Kevin McHugh were invited to a Faculty Senate meeting in hopes of being able to speak. Kiel, however, argues that they were under the wrong impression and rather wanted them to simply have a presence in the room. 

The Faculty Senate had passed a resolution encouraging members to “be imaginative, compassionate, and kind in response to student crises,” in hopes that this would ease student minds. 

With time running out and the pass/fail option seeming less likely, some SGA members are seeking better ways to help students. On Wednesday, “Resolution 23, Asking the University of Baltimore to extend the academic probation period due to the COVID-19 pandemic as an academic relief accommodation,” passed unanimously, signaling SGA’s willingness to continue to compromise in the near future while alleviating some of the fears of risk and reputation damage that come with alternative grading. 

The Fall 2020 semester ends on December 18.

Graham Antreasian is a staff writer for The Sting. 

University of Baltimore (UB) Sexual Assault Campus Climate Survey Results

By Elizabeth Paige

The University of Baltimore is committed to maintaining a university setting and educational environment that is healthy and nondiscriminatory for students, including an environment free of sexual misconduct of all types. In February 2016, UB’s Title IX Advisory Committee contracted with the UB Schaefer Center for Public Policy to administer a sexual assault campus climate survey to students to seek student input about the University’s climate and student experience regarding the incidence of sexual discrimination, misconduct and relationship violence. Thank you to the students that took the time to participate in this important research. Your survey responses and opinions matter to help inform the development of University programs and services.
The following information summarizes the results of the survey:
Between February 12 and February 29, 2016, 4,960 UB students were invited to participate in the sexual assault campus climate survey. Of those invited, 680 (16.65%) completed the survey with an additional 106 completing some of the survey questions:

  • The majority of students responding were aware of the UB Police Department and the UB Counseling Center as places to report instances of sexual misconduct.
  • The majority of students responding felt that UB would take reports of sexual misconduct seriously, handle the report fairly, maintain privacy, take steps to protect the safety and support the reporter of sexual misconduct and address factors that led to misconduct.
  • At the time of the survey, the majority of students responding had taken some sort of training about sexual assault or violence.
  • The majority of students responding correctly identified as “responsible employees” the UB Title IX Coordinator, any UB staff member, and regular UB faculty members.

The results of this survey will help the University in its work to keep the campus environment free of sexual discrimination. Such efforts include plans to make an effort to tailor sexual assault-related outreach and awareness activities to meet the needs of students within the individual colleges at UB, when possible and appropriate, noting that students’ needs may differ in certain colleges. UB will institute a cycle of providing students with notice about the Secure Escort and LiveSafe app to increase the number of students who have this app and to increase overall student awareness. UB will also seek additional methods to increase the response rate of campus climate surveys in the future.
To view the full report, please visit ubalt.edu/titleix
Please contact the Office of Government and Public Affairs at 410-837-4533 or ogpa@ubalt.edu with questions.