UB Online Degree Ranks 5th in Maryland

University of Baltimore has catered to non-traditional students by offering primarily evening and distance learning courses ever since the founding of the university in 1925. Technological advancements have allowed for this legacy to continue with cheap, high quality online degrees. 

These efforts have been recognized as the University of Baltimore is the 5th best online degree in the state, according to rankings from the SR Education Group. This ranking is compared to nearby universities like University of Maryland, Towson University, Stevenson University, and Frostburg.

Factors considered in this ranking include tuition cost and median earnings of program graduates. The annual tuition at the university is $7,014 with median earnings of program graduates around roughly $75,500. 

Degrees offered online through the University of Baltimore include bachelor degrees in business Administration and general Business, graduate degrees in data analytics and financial performance. 

This year’s rankings remain identical to 2019 rankings but show a slight improvement from 2018. In 2018, the university ranked #8 among colleges in Maryland. 

Kenny Lyle is a contributing writer to the UB Post.

Maryland Men Win in Second Straight Trip To Baltimore

jon-and-ernie-grahamAfter playing a game in Baltimore in December 2015 for the first time in 17 years, the Maryland men’s basketball team returned to Royal Farms Arena on December 20 against the Charlotte 49ers. With one of the top scorers in program history serving as an honorary captain on the anniversary of a record-setting night, the Terrapins struggled in front of a crowd that was on their side.

A layup by Ivan Bender of Serbia gave Maryland a 7-5 lead just over three minutes into the game. However, that two-point lead quickly turned to a two-point deficit as the 49ers’ Andrien White hit a three-pointer from the right elbow, was fouled by Maryland’s Kevin Huerter, and then made the free throw to complete the four-point play. That started an 8-0 run by the 49ers that gave them a 13-7 lead. Bender and Michal Cekovsky got increased playing time because of an injury to starting center Damonte Dodd.

Upper Marlboro native Jon Davis then gave the 49ers their largest lead of the game at 32-22 by finishing a pass from Braxton Ogbueze for a layup with 5:42 left in the first half. Turnovers and an inability to hit open jump shots and finish layups plagued the Terrapins throughout the first half, but they fought back as the half came to a close.

After Najee Garvin committed an offensive foul with nine seconds left, Melo Trimble drove down the court, but missed a layup. Cekovsky finished the ensuing scramble by tipping in the ball to beat the halftime buzzer and pull Maryland to within 37-36 at halftime. Anthony Cowan had nine points and Cekovsky scored eight to lead the Terrapins in the first half. Maryland shot just one for six from the three-point line, and turned the ball over 13 times, leading to 14 points for Charlotte. Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said Charlotte’s zone defense caught his team off-guard.

“We didn’t expect them to start in zone. We’ve been practicing in zone a lot, and it showed in the second half,” Turgeon said. “They did some things a little bit different in their zone, and we were just kind of standing around, and we just couldn’t really get any rhythm. The turnovers were disappointing…the no-look passes and throwing to guys that weren’t there.” Turgeon added that injuries and illness racked the team in the week leading up to the game.

The Terrapins got off to a fast and furious start in the second half, scoring on each of their first three possessions, capped by Cekovsky finishing off an alley-oop from Huerter. The layup gave Maryland a 42-39 lead and forced Charlotte to call a timeout just under a minute into the second half. The Terrapins retook the lead with an 11-2 run over a 3:42 stretch on a jumper by Bender and back-to-back-to-back three-pointers by Huerter and Cowan for a 56-49 lead with 11:15 left. Another three by Jared Nickens just over 30 seconds later extended the lead to 60-51. A goaltending call on an attempted layup by junior guard Melo Trimble gave Maryland a 67-55 lead when a media timeout was called with 7:32 left in regulation. However, the 49ers wouldn’t go away.

Davis scored 6 straight points for the 49ers to pull them to within 69-61, but L.G. Gill set up Nickens for a three-pointer that stretched the Maryland lead back out to 72-61 with just under six minutes left in regulation. Trimble and Brantley then hit back-to-back threes to give the Terrapins an 83-64 lead with 3:47 remaining, effectively putting the game out of reach. Maryland

closed out the game on a 16-9 run over the last five and a half minutes and cruised to a 88-72 win before a paid crowd of 7,139, improving to 12-1 heading into Big Ten play. Trimble finished with 21 points (17 in the second half) to lead the Terrapins, while freshman Anthony Cowan added 16. Cekovsky, Huerter and Bender each finished with 10. Davis led all scorers with 28 points for the 49ers.

This was the second straight year that Maryland has played a game in Baltimore, which is home to a significant portion of the team’s fan base. Turgeon praised the crowd in Baltimore.

“It’s the best crowd we’ve had in three or four games, so I was proud of that. Our guys like coming over here. Every time I come to this city, there are so many Terp fans over here that make you feel special, so we’ve enjoyed it the last two years. Of course, we won both games, which helps, and we’ve had great crowds, so it’s been a lot of fun,” Turgeon said.

During the first media timeout of the second half, honorary captains Ernie and Jon Graham were recognized. Ernie currently ranks 13th on the all-time scoring list at Maryland. On December 20, 1978, Graham set Maryland’s single-game scoring record by scoring 44 points as the Terrapins defeated North Carolina State 124-110 in the season opener of the 1978-1979 Atlantic Coast Conference at Cole Field House. Jon, a graduate of Calvert Hall College in Towson, played for two years at Penn State before transferring to Maryland for his senior season last year.

Maryland will begin its Big Ten schedule on Dec. 27 against Illinois at the Xfinity Center in College Park.

Maryland Hires Gary Williams For Senior Role in Athletics Department

Gary Williams brought the University of Maryland into the national spotlight with a successful 22-year run as the Terrapins’ men’s basketball coach, including a national championship in 2002. After retiring, Williams took a job as a college basketball analyst on Comcast Sportsnet Mid-Atlantic, where he’d offer his insight on games as well as the annual selection of the brackets for the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament. Now, Williams is back as an employee of the Athletics Department in College Park.

On Sept. 10, Williams, a Naismith Memorial and College Basketball Hall of Fame coach, was named the Senior Managing Director for Alumni Relations and Athletic Development. He’ll have a leardership role in the Division of University Relations, and will oversee fundraising for the University of Maryland Athletic Department. According to the Athletic Department, Williams will be in charge of a fundraising operation that raises more than $8 million for athletic scholarships. He’ll also be in charge of the Terrapin Club Scholarship Fund, which has more than 8,000 donors. The university says Williams will be focusing on raising money to renovate current athletic facilities and build new ones. Williams feels that his new job is about building up “Maryland Pride.”

“Our move to the Big Ten, the research that we do here, the students that study here, there’s a lot to be proud of,” Williams said in the statement released by the Athletic Department. As part of his new job, the university says Williams will be working to increase engagement and donations from more than 320,000 University of Maryland alumni, as well as alumni outreach on campus. He’ll also help manage the university’s new regional development plans in New York, Baltimore, South Florida and Los Angeles. Williams will also serve as the spokesman for the Alumni Association’s 25th Anniversary Celebration.

University of Maryland President Wallace Loh called the announcement of Williams’ new role an exciting moment in school history, and described it as not being much different than his previous job of coaching basketball.

“I like to think of Gary Williams as our new head coach of athletic fundraising and alumni outreach,” Loh said, adding that he feels Williams will be just as successful off the court as he was on it. Director of Athletics Kevin Anderson feels that Williams is the best person to represent the University of Maryland, and jumped at the opportunity to add him to the department’s leadership.

“When the opportunity presented itself to add Gary to our leadership team, we were eager to offer him this position to spearhead our fundraising efforts for scholarships and capital improvements,” Anderson said. He cited Williams’ time as a player, coach and ambassador for the university over the past 50 years.

“Gary represents our ‘Proud Past,’ and will be instrumental as we welcome the new ‘Fearless Future’ era at the University of Maryland,” Anderson said.

This won’t be Williams’ first time being in charge of fundraising for the university. He was a co-chair of the school’s $1 billion “Great Expectations” capital campaign.

Alyssa Thomas Begins WNBA Career

After a record-setting career at the University of Maryland, the next chapter in the basketball life of former Lady Terrapins star forward Alyssa Thomas has begun.

After setting the all-time scoring mark for both men’s and women’s basketball in College Park, Thomas was selected by the New York Liberty with the fourth overall pick in the WNBA draft on April 14. In a draft night trade, the Liberty sent Thomas to the Connecticut Sun in exchange for Tina Charles, who was named the league’s Most Valuable Player in 2012. The Sun also got center Kelsey Bone and New York’s first-round pick in next year’s draft as part of the trade. As a result, Thomas is teaming up with forward Chiney Ogwumike, who was the number one overall pick from Stanford University.

The Sun’s first game was against the Liberty on May 16. In her WNBA debut, Thomas had seven points, four rebounds and two assists in 24 minutes. So far this season, Thomas has appeared in nine games, and is averaging 8.7 points and 4.1 rebounds in 22.6 minutes per game. She’s shooting just over 44 percent from the floor and 69 percent from the free throw line. Her best performance so far was on May 30, when she scored 13 points and grabbed nine rebounds in a 101-82 loss at the Chicago Sky.

Thomas will be coming back to the Washington, DC, area to play later this season. The Sun will be playing the Washington Mystics at the Verizon Center on June 27, and again in an 11:30 matinee on July 23.

Maryland Selected to Host First Big Ten Men’s Lacrosse Tournament

University of Maryland Athletics will be joining the Big Ten Conference this Fall. However, the Terrapins have already been chosen for a major honor in one of the university’s premier sports.

The Big Ten announced that Maryland will host the conference’s first ever men’s lacrosse tournament next season. The tournament will be held at Byrd Stadium from April 30 to May 2, 2015, and will feature the conference’s top four lacrosse teams. Terrapins head coach John Tillman said that the tournament “will be a tremendous showcase for Big Ten lacrosse.”

The Big Ten added men’s and women’s lacrosse as sports in June 2013. That same month, the conference announced that Johns Hopkins University will be joining as an associate member in men’s lacrosse, starting with the 2014-2015 academic year. Maryland and Rutgers will become the fifth and sixth teams in Big Ten lacrosse. They’ll join Michigan, Penn State and Ohio State in lacrosse. Northwestern University will be an associate conference member in women’s lacrosse.

Rutgers will have the oldest men’s lacrosse program in the Big Ten when next season begins. The Scarlet Knights have been playing lacrosse since 1887. Penn State has been playing lacrosse since 1913, followed by Maryland, starting in 1924. Michigan has the newest men’s lacrosse team, adding the sport in 2012. The six Big Ten men’s lacrosse teams have a combined 56 national championships.

Showdown at the Comcast Corral: Maryland holds off Texas rally 69-64 to head to the Sweet Sixteen for the third year in a row

On Tuesday, March 25 at 7 p.m. the Maryland Terrapins and the Texas Longhorns faced off for the fifth time in school history, with Maryland leading the all-time series 3-1. The #4 seeded Terrapins entered the “Go Big or Go Home” battle 25-6 overall (12-4 in the ACC), while the #5 seeded Longhorns were 22-11 overall (11-7 in the Big 12). The second round matchup would determine if everything truly was bigger in Texas—unfortunately for the Longhorns, the Terrapins held on to win 69-64 and are headed to Louisville for their third Sweet Sixteen in a row where they will face off against #1 seeded Tennessee.

They did it again! The Terps' Women's Basketball team head to the Sweet Sixteen for the  third time in a row.
They did it again! The Terps’ Women’s Basketball team celebrates securing their trip to the Sweet Sixteen. (Photo credit: Maryland Athletics)

“Neither team deserved to lose that game—to be able to see the play of both teams between the runs and battles. It was a complete 40 minute game. I’m excited to be able to go [to the Sweet Sixteen], and we are going to make a run for the roses,” head coach Brenda Frese said after the game.

Gameplay started rough for the Terps with freshman guard Lexie Brown missing a jumper, followed by a foul by Katie Rutan, which sent Texas’s Brady Sanders to the line. She made both free throws, but Maryland’s senior center Alicia DeVaughn tied it up with a layup. Both teams went scoreless for at least the next three minutes, when Texas’s Chassidy Fussell broke the streak with a three-pointer to push Texas back in the lead by three. Back-to-back three-pointers by Terps’s guard Laurin Mincy, with a Texas jumper in between set the Terps off on a mini run, which was then stopped when Texas’s Brady Sanders returned to the line for two and make them both.

Frese attributed Mincy to be “a big piece of the runs we made tonight.” The point spread never rose more than three points until 6:44 left in the half when DeVaughn nailed a layup, sending the Maryland’s lead to five. Texas went on another short run, eventually leading by six with just over a minute and a half to go in the half. The Terps chipped at the Longhorn lead with a senior forward Alyssa Thomas shutout to tie the score at 31 at the half.

“I can’t remember the last time I’ve seen Alyssa [Thomas] with zero points and we were tied at halftime,” Frese said during the press conference. Thomas responded to questions about her not scoring in the first half, saying, “I was struggling to score and some of my teammates had a hot hand. I knew I just had to be patient and wait for my opportunity.”

The second half saw a change in Maryland’s strategy, but the Terps maintained the pace of the game. Thomas found her first points of the game at 18:21 with a jumper. Maryland got hot with 16:36 left in the game when Thomas made a jumper and was fouled which turned into an old-fashioned three-pointer for the Terps. She followed her free throw up with another layup after a missed jumper by Fussell and a rebound by Brown and the fans, a showing of 4,042, went wild. Maryland went off on another run which earned them the largest lead of the night, 11. A late run with three pointers scored first by Fussell, then back-to-back by Krystle Henderson cut the Terrapins’s lead to just a one-possession game at 2:11 to go. A layup, this time by Texas’s Imani McGee-Stafford cut the lead even further to a single point game. A missed three-pointer by Fussell, which would have given the lead to Texas, followed by a foul on McGee-Stafford which sent Mincy to the line for two (she made both), pushed the Terps’s lead back in the other direction. A missed potential game-tying three-pointer by Nekia Jones ultimately cost the Longhorns the opportunity to advance in the tournament. A late foul by McGee-Stafford, her fifth and final, sent Thomas to the line for two–she made both and thereby solidified Texas’s fate.

“Sequoia [Austin] and Chloe [Pavlech] gave me confidence. They told me they weren’t worried and told me to get to the basket and keep working,” Thomas said of her very different performance during the second half.

The big story of the night of course was Thomas being shut out in the first half to come back in the second and score 16 points, earning her 26th double-double for the season. Also leading in points was DeVaughn with 12 points and seven boards; Lexie Brown and Laurin Mincy had ten points apiece. Malina Howard, a starter early in the season also played 30 minutes and contributed nine points and three boards.

“It was poetic justice. She continued to keep fighting in practice and just kept working,” Frese said of giving Howard more than double the playing time she’s had in a single game all season.

The Terps head to Louisville, Kentucky, to play #1 seeded Tennessee on Sunday, March 30, where Coach Brenda Frese hopes to change the outcome of her two recent NCAA Sweet Sixteen appearances, which have ended in losses. Sunday’s game will mark the third straight trip to the Sweet Sixteen for Alyssa Thomas who played her last game at Comcast Center tonight.

“This is the most depth that we’ve had in the last four years that I’ve been here. Just the energy and how we are willing to fight for each other is definitely different. It’s going to be a special ride,” Thomas said of their road ahead for a chance at the championship title.

The game time is yet to be determined.

Follow me on Twitter @LawofCooking for updates.